Blu Ray Won The Format War Vs Hd Dvd-ddrtys

.puters-and-Technology "When DVD first launched it was anything but the perfect product," said Andy Parsons, Pioneer executive and chairman of the Blu Ray Disc Association. "There were many doubters that said there was little chance of overtaking VHS." Now, he said, the same thing is happening with Blu Ray, the natural evolution in audio-video technology. First of all, when looking at the Blu Ray vs HD DVD specifics, you’ll notice that Blu Ray discs have far superior storage space. Traditionally, DVDs were first made to hold 4.7 GB of material on a single-layer, and later, the double layer boosted storage capacity up to 8.5 Gigs. HD DVD promised to more than triple that, delivering 15-30 GBs. First of all, when looking at the Blu Ray vs HD DVD specifics, you’ll notice that Blu Ray discs have far superior storage space. Traditionally, DVDs were first made to hold 4.7 GB of material on a single-layer, and later, the double layer boosted storage capacity up to 8.5 Gigs. HD DVD promised to more than triple that, delivering 15-30 GBs. The next major difference between Blu Ray vs HD DVD was their alliances. Early on, motion picture .panies, manufacturers and distributors understood that they would need to get aligned with the new technology. But could Blu Ray and HD DVD coexist? It would be costly, not to mention extremely confusing for consumers. When the DVD format first came out, there was no mistaking a VHS tape and a DVD on the shelves. Unfortunately, the other major difference between the Blu Ray vs HD DVD players is price. You could purchase the XBox360 HD DVDs upgrade accessory for $130 and a stand-alone player for as low as $150. Sure, you could buy those super fancy .bo players for nearly $1,000, but the average offering was as affordable as a regular DVD player. The advent of high definition picture quality warranted this new medium because a two-hour movie in high def requires 22 GB of storage space, which is more than regular DVDs can handle. Some advocates see the Blu Ray disc player as training wheels for the technologically illiterate. "We can use HD discs to train consumers to move into digital, but it’s a transition," explains Dan Silverberg, vice president of high-definition media development at Warner Bros. "Downloaded content will .e, but the consumer will get quicker tutorials into video-on-demand, etc. by owning a Blu-ray player or HD DVD." While the Blu Ray vs HD DVD war is officially over, the Blu Ray vs. downloading war may have just begun. About the Author: 相关的主题文章: